• I ask the Minister for Training and Skills (for the Minister for Police): In light of the recommendation that an explicit target be set for recruitment of at least 50 per cent women for future squads of police and Protective Service Officers and that this remains in place until equality is achieved
  • I rise to speak on the Crimes Legislation Amendment (Public Order) Bill 2017. This bill does the following: it amends the Control of Weapons Act 1990 to provide police with additional powers so as to direct people wearing masks in certain circumstances to leave a designated area, it amends the Crimes Act 1958 to introduce new public order offences to replace existing common-law offences and it amends the Summary Offences Act 1966 to impose on local government a requirement to consult with Victoria Police when considering applications for permits that relate to proposed protests.
  • We know there are around 35 000 people on the public housing waiting list in Victoria, and this morning I spoke about homelessness and the growing rate of homelessness in Australia and in Victoria. In Victoria it has increased by more than 20 per cent — almost 21 per cent — in the last 10 years.
  • This week is Homelessness Week. There are certainly few issues more serious than being homeless — having nowhere to stay, nowhere to sleep, nowhere to keep your things, nowhere to eat your meals, nowhere to shower or wash your clothes, nowhere to go home to or to call home.
  • I rise to speak on the Crimes Amendment (Ramming of Police Vehicles) Bill 2017, a private members bill introduced by Mr Ed O'Donohue. The bill does the following: it creates a specific offence under the Crimes Act 1958 for ramming a police vehicle and provides for mandatory sentencing of a fixed non-parole period of two years imprisonment unless the court finds that a special reason exists under section 10A of the Sentencing Act 1991.
  • The Greens will support the motion put forward by Mr O'Donohue. Of course the events being referred to as the Brighton siege in the electorate of Southern Metropolitan Region were very concerning and, I think, are of ongoing concern to the community as to what was behind the events that day and of course the terrible loss of life, injury and trauma suffered by people who were caught up in it.
  • The Sentencing Amendment (Sentencing Standards) Bill 2017 does the following major things. It repeals the baseline sentencing scheme which was introduced by the previous government and in its stead establishes a new scheme called the standard sentencing scheme for certain indictable offences. It also enhances the guideline judgement scheme and makes an amendment to the definition of 'arson offence'.
  • I would like to say that we really cannot understand why the government actually brought this bill forward before the report from the Legal and Social Issues Committee on this particular issue has been finished and tabled, because the whole point of that inquiry was to better inform the legislative framework for this very important area, which impacts on the lives of young people every day.
  • I am very pleased to be speaking on the Appropriation (Parliament 2017–2018) Bill 2017 and that we are actually dealing with it, notwithstanding it being very late in the day, as mentioned by Mr Rich-Phillips.
  • The Bail Amendment (Stage One) Bill 2017 implements a number of the recommendations from the review, Bail Review: First Advice to the Victorian Government, conducted by the Honourable Paul Coghlan, QC, following the terrible events of 20 January 2017 in Bourke Street, and implements recommendation 80 of the Royal Commission into Family Violence.
  • Last Friday night my goddaughter, Emily, who has just completed a degree in zoology and animal science, and I went to hear Dr Jane Goodall speak in Melbourne. Jane Goodall is a hero of ours and of the thousands of people who were there to hear her speak and the millions of people all over the world who support and work for her many conservation programs.
  • So my question is: when will the new governance structures for Caulfield Racecourse Reserve be introduced?
  • I can say on behalf of the Greens, as is the case with all other parties, we will not be opposing the motion that is calling for documents. I listened to Mr Young's explanation as to why he has brought forward the motion. If I got the gist of it, it was that somehow perhaps the advice that is going from the police to police ministers in the context of the Council of Australian Governments discussions on firearms across Australia may be incorrect or not kosher.
  • I am very pleased to speak on the Sex Offenders Registration Amendment (Miscellaneous) Bill 2017, which is before us this evening. The main purpose of the bill is to introduce some very important registration exemption orders under the Sex Offenders Registration Act 2004 (SORA). I am very pleased to see these reforms being introduced by the government. That, I would say, is the main reason for the bill and the main impetus behind the bill, but it also makes some other changes, particularly with regard to the collection of forensics samples, fingerprints and finger scans from those people who are currently on the sex offenders register and for whom the police do not have those forensics samples.
  • This year National Reconciliation Week coincided with some very significant anniversaries: 27 May marked the 50th anniversary of the 1967 referendum to amend the Australian constitution to include Aboriginal people in the constitution and to allow the commonwealth to create laws for them, which won the support of more than 90 per cent of Australians and all states; 3 June marks 25 years since the Mabo decision of the High Court that terra nullius should not have been applied to Australia and recognised that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have rights to the land that existed before the British arrived and still exist today; and 26 May marked 20 years since the Bringing Them Home report was tabled in the Parliament of Australia, chronicling the devastation that was wreaked on Aboriginal people by the forced removal of Aboriginal children from their families.