Speeches from politicians in vic

  • My adjournment matter is for the Minister for Families and Children. The action I am seeking is that she remove the requirement for government school principals and school council presidents to sign statutory declarations as part of their child safe obligations, noting legal advice that it is unnecessary and unsuited to the purpose and noting that there are alternative instruments that would fulfil the same purpose.
  • Adolescent violence in the home has increased substantially over the last 10 years. Data from Victoria Police from between 2007 and 2012 showed a 40 per cent jump in incidents over that period. More recent data is not available, but those working in the field believe this trend has continued over recent years.
  • While there are so many challenges that Victorian and Australian women face on a daily basis, today I would like to reflect on this house and take stock of our own progress. Looking around this chamber I see many women, but frankly not enough. Women's representation in Australian politics has improved over the past 20 years, but progress has been sluggish.
  • Victorians deserve to know the basis for Ms Mikakos's decision to propose a brand-new youth justice facility at Werribee South. On youth justice the Andrews government has been short on detail, information and consultation and very long on rhetoric.
  • I move that this house takes note of the rising vilification of and discrimination against Victorian Muslims and calls on all political parties to take a stand against this and to preference One Nation last on the ballot at the 2018 Victorian state election.
  • We have argued strongly for many years now that the recommendations of the Betrayal of Trust report and the Cummins report must be implemented in full and as soon as possible. We support independent oversight of investigations into misconduct within any organisation that works with children
  • An underpinning of what has made Victorian multiculturalism strong over the decades is the resilience of our communities. Through generations of migrants and refugees like mine, who have landed on these shores and made a life for themselves despite the hardships that have come before their arrival, so many have embraced the opportunities presented with both hands and triumphed.
  • I rise today to talk about a trip that I made the weekend before last up to an area just out of Lexton for the Rainbow Serpent Festival to view and be shown around the festival and its new safe space for women, including women who have been victims of sexual assault.
  • Australian research has found that around half of all women report having been harassed or assaulted at licensed venues. We also know that Australia in general and Victoria in particular have very high rates of sexual violence by a non-partner when measured globally.
  • On Sunday, in such explosive political times, it was a real pleasure and privilege to attend, with my Greens colleague Greg Barber and David Southwick, the member for Caulfield in the other place, a multicultural picnic in Caulfield organised by the Jewish community to celebrate diversity and social cohesion.
  • The Greens strongly support the government's efforts to implement the recommendations of the Royal Commission into Family Violence. Implementing these recommendations represents a catalyst for the deconstruction of a toxic culture that is deeply embedded within the psyche of our nation, a culture that finds its root causes in the power imbalance between men and women.
  • It is clear from the Working with Children Checks Report by the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse that a national approach is required to working with children checks.
  • Over the last week we have seen a blatant undermining by certain political leaders at both state and federal level of what makes our Victorian community great. Singling out people from certain ethnic minorities for punitive purposes or blame-shifting for whatever reason is tantamount to racial profiling and vilification. That is not the sort of leadership we need.
  • The enforcement and oversight powers for the Commission for Children and Young People included in this bill will continue the process of bolstering those standards and facilitating much-needed organisational change as community groups develop and implement these strategies, and that is a very good thing. The bill is the fulfilment of the minister's assurances last year that suitable legislation would be introduced to establish appropriate oversight and monitoring mechanisms.
  • Child protection is a particularly vexed issue for many of Victoria's Aboriginal communities. On the one hand, the state does have a responsibility to ensure that each and every Victorian child is protected from harm, abuse and neglect in cases where natural parents cannot do so, for whatever reason. On the other hand, the removal of Aboriginal children from their families has so often meant their removal from their communities and therefore also from their cultures and source of strength and identity.
  • My question is for the Minister for Agriculture. On the opening weekend of the duck shooting season at First Marsh, near Kerang, I noticed the presence of quite a large number of children at the wetland. In fact I saw some children entering the water accompanied by an adult with a shotgun.